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Plans in place for new diversion centre at waste disposal grounds

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The City of Dauphin is looking to tighten up operations at its waste disposal site, through the development of a diversion centre to keep recyclable materials out of the waste stream.
Director of Public Works and Operations, Bill Brenner said similar to what is in place at the Winnipeg and Brandon disposal grounds, the centre will make sure everything that can be recycled, will be.
Household hazardous waste is one example of what the diversion centre will target.
“As you know we only do a collection day every September each year. So that’s probably the biggest portion. We’ll have full-time household hazardous waste collection,” Brenner said.
“So anybody can go out to the waste disposal site if you have bulbs, paint, whatever the case may be and we’ll take it all.”
The plan is to accept oil, filters and antifreeze in smaller amounts.
“If you’ve got larger amounts we’re going to send them to Ecoil. But, you know, for the backyard mechanic or whatever, you’ll be able to bring your own and we’ll have the facilities to take that stuff,” Brenner said.
In addition, the centre will also accept materials such as batteries, cell phones and electronic waste.
“So in essence the city wants a one-stop shop out there for everything. so we will take it all out there during regular hours,” Brenner said, adding the diversion centre builds on the collection and diversion of pesticide, containers, mattresses, tires, scrap metal and refrigerators, which is already taking place at the dump.
Plans are also in the works to include a means of exchanging reusable material such as bicycles, he said.
“So if you have used bikes that you don’t want and that are working, we are going to try and keep them out there and either use them to give away or we may look at like a bike share program to use them in town. We’re not sure exactly, but that would be another thing that we’ll collect,” Brenner said, adding he is also examining the idea of a pallet drop off and lumber exchange area where people can drop off lumber they no longer want for others to use.
“People like pallets for projects, so you’ll be able to get rid of pallets out there.
“And if you’ve got a couple of four-foot 2x4s that you cut up that you just don’t want anymore, you’ll be able to drop it off for free and anybody will be able to use it. If you need a four-foot chunk or a couple of pieces of 2x4, you go out there and see if you can grab a couple of pieces rather than all that stuff just ending up in the landfill. If you have little cut-offs from dimensional lumber there will be a bin there because people use that for firewood. You’ll be able to throw that in there if you don’t want it for firewood, maybe somebody else wants it.”
The plan is to offer the service for free where possible, although there are some materials that will have a cost attached to them.
“We’ll still have the stuff that, unfortunately, we have to pay to get recycled, so that we have to charge for. Those you’ll still have to pay and go through the gate. So there will be a separate facility for the free stuff to give away,” Brenner said, adding the idea behind the centre is to give people a one-stop recycling option rather than them having to travel to multiple locations for different materials.
Large amounts of recyclable materials end up in the waste stream because it is too hard for people to dispose of them properly, he said.
“We just want to have one spot where everybody can go and get rid of everything that they can for free, hopefully, keeping it out of our collection, out of our waste. It’s just too hard for people, unless you’re the most hard core recycler.”